Brooklyn Artist Kimberly M. Becoat Honors Past, Present & Future Narratives

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Survival of the fittest (hood tales), Urbania Series, 36" X 40", mixed media collage on paper, 2015.

Survival of the fittest (hood tales), Urbania Series, 36″ X 40″, mixed media collage on paper, 2015.

Kimberly M. Becoat is a contemporary mixed media artist whose work is a stylistic abstraction with a conceptual investigation of new materials and visual experiences with social commentary. African Voices has commissioned Kimberly to design the front forthcoming cover of our Fall/Winter 2015 issue. She is creating a piece to honor the art and tradition of typography.

“My artwork incorporates layers of drawings and painting with found/recycled objects as well as work developed in commercial-driven, advertising styled paintings with elements of graffiti. My recent abstract & conceptual work is grounded in texture and structure, based in collage and de-collage using repurposed objects, and sand mixtures of paint creating an architectural structure to the work that investigates the urban landscape (or the projects as they are called in northern areas) – and their socio- economic changes within these environments, as well as work that recreates a personal history and narrative of my own experience growing up in East Harlem in public housing, with interwoven stories of pop culture movements that permeated at specific times in my childhood.

Also, I investigate the migrations of Black Americans to the North in an anthropological abstract way of recalling traces/ markings and paths taken on the journey to the northern states. I fabricate “fossils” of what may have been found or interject stones twine and rice paper in a mapping of how Black Americans might have existed within that time frame, creating possible personal narratives alongside of historical constructs.”

Kimberly M. Becoat.

Kimberly M. Becoat.

Kimberly has also been featured in a number of exhibits including her solo exhibition, New Abstractions at Essie Green Galleries, BAMart at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, MoCADA Museum, (The Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts, as well as the Deutsche Bank; their objective is to support living artists, fostering creativity and recognizing innovative ideas for the 21st century.

A few other exhibitions include, March On!, BAMart (Brooklyn, N.Y.), Honoring Romare Bearden, The Corridor Gallery (Brooklyn, N.Y.), Pattern Recognition, MoCADA Museum in Brooklyn, New York, and Dirty Sensibilities: A 21st Century Exploration of the New American Black South, at the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute, New York, NY. For more information on Kimberly visit www.kimberlymbecoat.com.

Kimberly presently resides and works as an artist in Brooklyn, NY.

First draft of front cover project for African Voices.

First draft of front cover project for African Voices.

Project Metropolis (Urbania Series), 23 1/2 x 18 inches, watercolor on paper with collaged elements, 2015.

Project Metropolis (Urbania Series), 23 1/2 x 18 inches, watercolor on paper with collaged elements, 2015.

 

Adobo (Urbania Series), 23 1/2 x 18 inches , watercolor on paper, 2015.

Adobo (Urbania Series), 23 1/2 x 18 inches , watercolor on paper, 2015.

 

2 Comments

  1. Once I was a colored man sliding across a clear glass floor. Who danced with a artistic paint brush with a abstract smile and a unique style. The skyline was eclipsed. In between we mixed and faded away into a scorpion backdrop. Body chemistry flavored like a chocolate lollipop. Mind energy like a African blowpop.
    Are design of art was and still is… remarkable. In Brooklyn they say ..unbelievable.. but I am invisible. So are abstraction can only be identified in memory or what was and what should of been…………… The In…

    SwiggsCity.
    Your a Amazing Master Artist … Respect.

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